The National Court Reporters Association (NCRA), the country’s leading organization representing stenographic court reporters, captioners, and legal videographers, has announced that Stephanie Cousins has earned the nationally recognized Certified Realtime Reporter (CRR) certification, reflecting her timely knowledge of cutting-edge realtime technology, and proficiency and accuracy of reporting. Realtime reporting uses a stenograph machine connected to a computer to produce an immediate transcript of spoken word converted to text.

Earning CRR credentials ensure a reporter is an expert in the specialized field of realtime reporting. CRRs are highly sought after because of their proven precision in reporting and ability to deliver high-quality realtime services.

Cousins, from Griswold, is a member of NCRA and has worked as a court reporter for 36 years. She also holds the professional certification of Registered Professional Reporter (RPR). Cousins is currently a court reporter for Huney-Vaughn Court Reporters, Iowa’s largest court reporting firm.

To be recognized as a CRR, candidates must hold the Registered Professional Reporter (RPR) certification and have passed, with high accuracy, tests that include equipment set-up, accurate realtime writing, and prove they hold a thorough knowledge of realtime technology.

“A drive for proficiency of the written word has been my lifelong career. In the words of Leonardo da Vinci, ‘All knowledge which ends in words will die as quickly as it came to life, with the exception of the written word: which is its mechanical part,’” Cousins said.

The court reporting and captioning professions offer viable career choices that do not require a four-year college degree and yet offer good salaries, flexible schedules, and interesting venues. There is currently an increasing demand for more reporters and captioners to meet the growing number of employment opportunities available nationwide and abroad. Court reporters and captioners rely on the latest in technology to use stenographic machines to capture the spoken word and translate it into written text in real time. These professionals work both in and out of the courtroom recording legal cases and depositions, providing live captioning of events, and assisting members of the deaf and hard-of-hearing communities with gaining access to information, entertainment, educational opportunities, and more.

To arrange an interview with a working court reporter or captioner, or to learn more about the lucrative and flexible court reporting or captioning professions and the many job opportunities currently available, contact pr@ncra.org.

About NCRA

The National Court Reporters Association (NCRA) has been the internationally recognized for promoting excellence among those who capture and convert the spoken word to text for more than 100 years. NCRA is committed to supporting its more than 14,000 members in achieving the highest level of professional expertise with educational opportunities and industry-recognized court reporting, educator and videographer certification programs. NCRA impacts legislative issues and the global marketplace through its actively involved membership. Forbes has named court reporting as one of the best career options that do not require a traditional four-year degree, and the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that the court reporting field is expected to grow by 14 percent through the year 2020. Career information about the court reporting profession—one of the leading career options that do not require a traditional four-year degree—can be found at NCRA DiscoverSteno.org.